Therapy in a Nutshell
Overcome Social Anxiety | Medication and Therapy Options With Dr. Tracey Marks

Overcome Social Anxiety | Medication and Therapy Options With Dr. Tracey Marks

September 26, 2022

Pre-order Dr. Marks' book Why Am I So Anxious now: getyourpreorder.com

Social anxiety can be paralyzing, you may overthink everything you say or worry that everyone is judging you. Social anxiety can lead to avoidance of important events and social isolation which can lead to other problems in your employment or relationships. In this video, I've invited Dr. Tracy Marks to share her top tips for dealing with social anxiety. She'll teach you two medication options for treating social anxiety and one powerful therapy option to retrain your brain to manage social anxiety differently - how to use an exposure hierarchy and gradual exposure to get better and better at facing social situations. Social anxiety doesn't have to be permanently disabling. With these tools you can learn to overcome social anxiety and take your life back.

Looking for affordable online counseling? My sponsor, BetterHelp, connects you to a licensed professional from the comfort of your own home. Try it now for 10% off your first month: https://betterhelp.com/therapyinanuts...

Learn more in one of my in-depth mental health courses: https://courses.therapyinanutshell.co...

Support my mission on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/therapyinanut...

Sign up for my newsletter: https://www.therapyinanutshell.com?utm_medium=YTDescription&utm_source=YouTube

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Therapy in a Nutshell and the information provided by Emma McAdam are solely intended for informational and entertainment purposes and are not a substitute for advice, diagnosis, or treatment regarding medical or mental health conditions. Although Emma McAdam is a licensed marriage and family therapist, the views expressed on this site or any related content should not be taken for medical or psychiatric advice. Always consult your physician before making any decisions related to your physical or mental health. In therapy I use a combination of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Systems Theory, positive psychology, and a bio-psycho-social approach to treating mental illness and other challenges we all face in life. The ideas from my videos are frequently adapted from multiple sources. Many of them come from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, especially the work of Steven Hayes, Jason Luoma, and Russ Harris. The sections on stress and the mind-body connection derive from the work of Stephen Porges (the Polyvagal theory), Peter Levine (Somatic Experiencing) Francine Shapiro (EMDR), and Bessel Van Der Kolk. I also rely heavily on the work of the Arbinger institute for my overall understanding of our ability to choose our life's direction.

And deeper than all of that, the Gospel of Jesus Christ orients my personal worldview and sense of security, peace, hope, and love https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/c...

If you are in crisis, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/ or 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or your local emergency services.

Copyright Therapy in a Nutshell, LLC

How to Stop an Anxiety Attack

How to Stop an Anxiety Attack

September 22, 2022

Learn grounding skills for anxiety attacks in my free course: https://courses.therapyinanutshell.com/grounding-skills-for-anxiety-stress-and-ptsd

An anxiety attack, in my definition, is when you're overwhelmed with stress, fear or anxiety, you may feel panicky or your anxiety is so strong and the physical symptoms are so intense that you can’t function very well. This video is going to teach you the psychology behind calming anxiety attacks and give you a ton of tools to try so that you can create your custom plan to stop anxiety attacks. If you're right in the middle of an anxiety attack and just want to be walked through one simple version of the process check out my other video- A guided walkthrough to calm anxiety attacks. This video is more educational in nature, you’ll learn a bunch of options that you can learn and apply to anxiety attacks later. Panic attacks and anxiety attacks have a lot of overlapping symptoms, and people use these terms interchangeably, but there are essentially two different pathways to treating them (rolling with them, or calming down your body). I teach option #1 in my video series on how to stop a panic attack. In today’s video I’m going to teach you a ton of options for pathway #2- the calm down approach to anxiety attacks. My goal is to teach you a bunch of tools, then you can try them and find the one that works for you in the long run. If you have chronic panic attacks and trying to control your breathing or calm down makes you feel worse, then definitely watch my other videos on how to stop panic attacks. https://youtu.be/wR8oKZ5qTfk 1. Understand what feeds anxiety attacks. This short term emotion of anxiety is not the problem. Don't be afraid of anxiety, and don’t struggle to make anxiety go away immediately. This actually makes things worse. 2. Slow down instead of speed up 3. Anxiety isn’t just in your head, it’s in your body, so when you’re super upset, the body is the gateway to resolving anxiety. 4. Remind yourself that you are safe 5. The real problem here is not that you have emotions, or that you have an anxiety attack, the real problem is that you don’t have a system to resolve anxiety, so it’s building up and boiling over. The real problem is that you haven't developed a sustainable way to manage stress in your life

Looking for affordable online counseling? My sponsor, BetterHelp, connects you to a licensed professional from the comfort of your own home. Try it now for 10% off your first month: https://betterhelp.com/therapyinanutshell Learn more in one of my in-depth mental health courses: https://courses.therapyinanutshell.com/store

Support my mission on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/therapyinanutshell

Sign up for my newsletter: https://www.therapyinanutshell.com?utm_medium=YTDescription&utm_source=YouTube

Check out my favorite self-help books: https://kit.co/TherapyinaNutshell/best-self-help-books

Therapy in a Nutshell and the information provided by Emma McAdam are solely intended for informational and entertainment purposes and are not a substitute for advice, diagnosis, or treatment regarding medical or mental health conditions. Although Emma McAdam is a licensed marriage and family therapist, the views expressed on this site or any related content should not be taken for medical or psychiatric advice. Always consult your physician before making any decisions related to your physical or mental health. In therapy I use a combination of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Systems Theory, positive psychology, and a bio-psycho-social approach to treating mental illness and other challenges we all face in life. The ideas from my videos are frequently adapted from multiple sources. Many of them come from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, especially the work of Steven Hayes, Jason Luoma, and Russ Harris. The sections on stress and the mind-body connection derive from the work of Stephen Porges (the Polyvagal theory), Peter Levine (Somatic Experiencing) Francine Shapiro (EMDR), and Bessel Van Der Kolk. I also rely heavily on the work of the Arbinger institute for my overall understanding of our ability to choose our life's direction.

And deeper than all of that, the Gospel of Jesus Christ orients my personal worldview and sense of security, peace, hope, and love https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/comeuntochrist/believe

If you are in crisis, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/ or 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or your local emergency services.

Copyright Therapy in a Nutshell, LLC

7 Anxiety Myths Most People Believe with Dr. Nick Wignall

7 Anxiety Myths Most People Believe with Dr. Nick Wignall

September 19, 2022

Sign up for Nick's newsletter here: https://nickwignall.com/newsletter-5/

Download my Quickstart Guide to Anxiety here: https://therapyinanutshell.com/

Anxiety disorders are absolutely treatable, but most people don't actually understand what is the real cause of their anxiety- they assume that anxiety is caused by genes or by childhood experiences, but the truth is, we make our own anxiety worse by accidentally believing these myths about anxiety. Today I've invited Nick Wignall on the channel to talk about 7 Anxiety myths that most people mistakenly believe. Nick is a Psychologist who specializes in anxiety disorders and I personally love his newsletter. you can learn more about Nick at NickWignall.com Hey everyone, by the time you’re watching this, I’ve got a new baby- so I’m not making videos for a bit- but one of my favorite psychology writers Nick Wignall has generously offered to help me out. Nick’s a psychologist who specializes in Anxiety and basically every time I read one of his articles, I learn something. In this video he’s going to share 7 anxiety myths that most people believe, but before we jump in, I want to add in one more myth that I’ve seen pretty frequently- So here goes

Looking for affordable online counseling? My sponsor, BetterHelp, connects you to a licensed professional from the comfort of your own home. Try it now for 10% off your first month: https://betterhelp.com/therapyinanuts...

Learn more in one of my in-depth mental health courses: https://courses.therapyinanutshell.co...

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Therapy in a Nutshell and the information provided by Emma McAdam are solely intended for informational and entertainment purposes and are not a substitute for advice, diagnosis, or treatment regarding medical or mental health conditions. Although Emma McAdam is a licensed marriage and family therapist, the views expressed on this site or any related content should not be taken for medical or psychiatric advice. Always consult your physician before making any decisions related to your physical or mental health. In therapy I use a combination of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Systems Theory, positive psychology, and a bio-psycho-social approach to treating mental illness and other challenges we all face in life. The ideas from my videos are frequently adapted from multiple sources. Many of them come from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, especially the work of Steven Hayes, Jason Luoma, and Russ Harris. The sections on stress and the mind-body connection derive from the work of Stephen Porges (the Polyvagal theory), Peter Levine (Somatic Experiencing) Francine Shapiro (EMDR), and Bessel Van Der Kolk. I also rely heavily on the work of the Arbinger institute for my overall understanding of our ability to choose our life's direction.

And deeper than all of that, the Gospel of Jesus Christ orients my personal worldview and sense of security, peace, hope, and love https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/c...

If you are in crisis, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/ or 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or your local emergency services. Copyright Therapy in a Nutshell, LLC

Postpartum Anxiety and OCD Coping Skills

Postpartum Anxiety and OCD Coping Skills

September 15, 2022

Check out my Coping Skills and Self Care course: https://courses.therapyinanutshell.com/coping-skills-and-self-care-for-mental-health

Learn more in one of my in-depth mental health courses: https://courses.therapyinanutshell.com/store

The number one most common complication after giving birth is postpartum anxiety- but almost no one is talking about it. It’s more common than infection, hemorrhage, or postpartum depression, but no one mentions it. But postpartum anxiety is super duper common. About 1 in 5 women experience heightened anxiety to the point of distress post partum. And it can make a new mom feel like her world is falling apart. But PPA is not your fault and it is treatable, so let’s talk about it and what we can do about it. One study showed that at least 18% of women experienced postpartum anxiety, it's probably much higher because it's underreported. And of the women with anxiety, 35% of them had postpartum depression as well. So let’s help people learn the signs of Postpartum Anxiety so they know to get the support they need. Signs and Symptoms Constant worry or dread- Worry about the baby’s safety, health and development Feeling on edge, like something is about to go wrong Excessive worry about your ability to handle being a parent. Irritability Sleep disruption- you can’t sleep because you’re worried (not just because that little munchkin wants a snack every 45 minutes) Racing thoughts Intrusive thoughts-like that you might harm a baby Physical symptoms like: feeling shaky, trembly, jittery, stomach aches, headaches, sweating, short breathing, etc. It usually occurs within the first couple weeks after birth, but can be triggered much later, even when you wean the baby. Some women experience symptoms of panic attacks or OCD Over 50 percent of new parents have recurrent intrusive thoughts of them harming the baby, like “What if I drop the baby?” so this is pretty normal, but for some people this leads to Postpartum OCD when obsessive thoughts become compulsive and overpowering. Compulsions are actions that are repeated to stop the anxiety and include frequent checking, cleaning or ordering things.

Looking for affordable online counseling? My sponsor, BetterHelp, connects you to a licensed professional from the comfort of your own home. Try it now for 10% off your first month: https://betterhelp.com/therapyinanutshell

Support my mission on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/therapyinanutshell

Sign up for my newsletter: https://www.therapyinanutshell.com?utm_medium=YTDescription&utm_source=YouTube

Check out my favorite self-help books: https://kit.co/TherapyinaNutshell/best-self-help-books

Therapy in a Nutshell and the information provided by Emma McAdam are solely intended for informational and entertainment purposes and are not a substitute for advice, diagnosis, or treatment regarding medical or mental health conditions. Although Emma McAdam is a licensed marriage and family therapist, the views expressed on this site or any related content should not be taken for medical or psychiatric advice. Always consult your physician before making any decisions related to your physical or mental health. In therapy I use a combination of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Systems Theory, positive psychology, and a bio-psycho-social approach to treating mental illness and other challenges we all face in life. The ideas from my videos are frequently adapted from multiple sources. Many of them come from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, especially the work of Steven Hayes, Jason Luoma, and Russ Harris. The sections on stress and the mind-body connection derive from the work of Stephen Porges (the Polyvagal theory), Peter Levine (Somatic Experiencing) Francine Shapiro (EMDR), and Bessel Van Der Kolk. I also rely heavily on the work of the Arbinger institute for my overall understanding of our ability to choose our life's direction.

And deeper than all of that, the Gospel of Jesus Christ orients my personal worldview and sense of security, peace, hope, and love https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/comeuntochrist/believe

If you are in crisis, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/ or 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or your local emergency services.

Copyright Therapy in a Nutshell, LLC

How to Stop Catastrophizing

How to Stop Catastrophizing

September 13, 2022

Get the course: Change Your Brain-Neuroplasticity and Mental Health https://courses.therapyinanutshell.com/change-your-brain

In this video, we’re going to talk about catastrophizing- expecting the worst! Catastrophizing is an excellent way to make yourself anxious and depressed and completely ruin your life! Oh yeah, and I’m going to teach you 3 things you can do to stop catastrophizing. What is Catastrophizing: Catastrophizing is a common cognitive distortion, or thinking error. It’s when we think of a current or future situation as a catastrophe. So for example, you worry that you’re going to fail a test. Then you imagine what would happen when you do fail- you’re going to get kicked out of school, end up working a dead end job, fail at life at life and die homeless on the street. And all this because of a test at school. Catastrophizing is imagining the worst. It’s taking a difficult situation and interpreting it as being horrible, terrible, and unrecoverable. We’ve all known that person who, if they got a “B” on a test wailed “I’m failing Math class”. Many of us have had that parent who, when we didn’t want to do our chores they said something like “If you don’t do your chores, your college roommates will hate you and no one will want to marry you.” Like in the story about the jack, Catastrophizing often starts with a genuine setback, like getting a flat tire in the middle of nowhere, but then the thinking error turns that reality into the belief that something horrible is bound to happen- “I’m going to get shot, attacked and robbed!”. At its root, catastrophizing is about our habitual response to challenges or shortcomings. So take a second, pause this video and ask yourself: How do you think about failure? When these habits become part of a repeated pattern, they lead to depression or anxiety- and people tend to imagine never being able to recover. Catastrophizing is a thinking error (aka cognitive distortion) that makes you anxious, depressed, and unmotivated.

Looking for affordable online counseling? My sponsor, BetterHelp, connects you to a licensed professional from the comfort of your own home. Try it now for 10% off: https://betterhelp.com/therapyinanutshell

Learn more in one of my in-depth mental health courses: https://courses.therapyinanutshell.com/

Support my mission on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/therapyinanutshell

Sign up for my newsletter: https://www.therapynutshell.com?utm_medium=YTDescription&utm_source=YouTube

Check out my favorite self-help books: https://kit.co/TherapyinaNutshell/best-self-help-books

Therapy in a Nutshell, LLC, and the information provided by Emma McAdam are solely intended for informational and entertainment purposes and are not a substitute for advice, diagnosis, or treatment regarding medical or mental health conditions. Although Emma McAdam is a licensed marriage and family therapist, the views expressed on this site or any related content should not be taken for medical or psychiatric advice. Always consult your physician before making any decisions related to your physical or mental health. About Me: I’m Emma McAdam. I’m a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, and I have worked in various settings of change and growth since 2004. My experience includes juvenile corrections, adventure therapy programs, wilderness therapy programs, an eating disorder treatment center, a residential treatment center, and I currently work in an outpatient therapy clinic. In therapy I use a combination of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Systems Theory, positive psychology, and a bio-psycho-social approach to treating mental illness and other challenges we all face in life. The ideas from my videos are frequently adapted from multiple sources. Many of them come from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, especially the work of Steven Hayes, Jason Luoma, and Russ Harris. The sections on stress and the mind-body connection derive from the work of Stephen Porges (the Polyvagal theory), Peter Levine (Somatic Experiencing) Francine Shapiro (EMDR), and Bessel Van Der Kolk. I also rely heavily on the work of the Arbinger institute for my overall understanding of our ability to choose our life's direction.

And deeper than all of that, the Gospel of Jesus Christ orients my personal worldview and sense of security, peace, hope, and love https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/comeuntochrist/believe

If you are in crisis, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org

or 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or your local emergency services.

Copyright Therapy in a Nutshell, LLC

---- Music licensed from www.Bensound.com or Artlist.io Images from Freepik.com (premium license), Pixabay, or Wikimedia commons

Quick Start Guide to Anxiety Treatment

Quick Start Guide to Anxiety Treatment

September 12, 2022

Learn a mind-body approach to treating anxiety in my FREE course Grounding Skills for Anxiety, Stress and PTSD: https://courses.therapyinanutshell.co...

An anxiety disorder diagnosis does not mean that you are defective, nor that it’s your fault, you’re not broken. The disorder is treatable. It doesn’t have to be permanent! Anxiety is a real and challenging condition where our physiology, our mind, and our experiences get caught up in a cycle of increasing worries and physical symptoms. But that cycle can be turned around with the right knowledge, skills and practice. It may be difficult to break the pattern on your own, but with the right support and resources you can overcome an anxiety disorder! In this video learn 10 ways you can treat anxiety, decrease stress and become healthier and happier.

Looking for affordable online counseling? My sponsor, BetterHelp, connects you to a licensed professional from the comfort of your own home. Try it now for 10% off your first month: https://betterhelp.com/therapyinanuts...

Learn more in one of my in-depth mental health courses: https://courses.therapyinanutshell.co...

Support my mission on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/therapyinanut...

Sign up for my newsletter: https://www.therapyinanutshell.com?utm_medium=YTDescription&utm_source=YouTube

Check out my favorite self-help books: https://kit.co/TherapyinaNutshell/bes... 

Therapy in a Nutshell and the information provided by Emma McAdam are solely intended for informational and entertainment purposes and are not a substitute for advice, diagnosis, or treatment regarding medical or mental health conditions. Although Emma McAdam is a licensed marriage and family therapist, the views expressed on this site or any related content should not be taken for medical or psychiatric advice. Always consult your physician before making any decisions related to your physical or mental health. In therapy I use a combination of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Systems Theory, positive psychology, and a bio-psycho-social approach to treating mental illness and other challenges we all face in life. The ideas from my videos are frequently adapted from multiple sources. Many of them come from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, especially the work of Steven Hayes, Jason Luoma, and Russ Harris. The sections on stress and the mind-body connection derive from the work of Stephen Porges (the Polyvagal theory), Peter Levine (Somatic Experiencing) Francine Shapiro (EMDR), and Bessel Van Der Kolk. I also rely heavily on the work of the Arbinger institute for my overall understanding of our ability to choose our life's direction.

And deeper than all of that, the Gospel of Jesus Christ orients my personal worldview and sense of security, peace, hope, and love https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/c...

If you are in crisis, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/ or 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or your local emergency services. Copyright Therapy in a Nutshell, LLC

Overthinking Part 4: Social Anxiety

Overthinking Part 4: Social Anxiety

September 8, 2022

Looking for affordable online counseling? My sponsor, BetterHelp, connects you to a licensed professional from the comfort of your own home. Try it now for 10% off your first month: https://betterhelp.com/therapyinanutshell

You know the feeling, you come out of a work meeting or a hangout with friends and start thinking “Why did I say that? I should have responded this way! I am such an idiot! What did he mean when he said…?” Or you think “I was the most awkward person at the party!” Or “I overshared, way too much personal information” or you worry “Did I hurt someone’s feelings!?” This type of overthinking can be a symptom of social anxiety disorder, it can also just be a symptom of anxiety in general. But when you overanalyze your personal relationships to the point that you are afraid of an emotional connection with another person you’re essentially slipping into a mental rut called Rumination. It’s really common and there’s a lot you can do about it. In this video we’re going to learn 4 ways to stop overthinking every social situation. 1. Learn to notice your cognitive distortions about social situations and social anxiety 2. People aren't nearly as obsessed with you as you are with yourself, social anxiety lies to you 3. Catch yourself when you catastrophize about social situations 4. Social anxiety is fueled by underlying beliefs like: I must be perfect to be accepted I must never make anyone else uncomfortable I must never make a mistake in front of another person I must never be weird You can learn to combat social anxiety by learning to challenge your thoughts.

Learn more in one of my in-depth mental health courses: https://courses.therapyinanutshell.com/store

Support my mission on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/therapyinanutshell

Sign up for my newsletter: https://www.therapyinanutshell.com?utm_medium=YTDescription&utm_source=YouTube

Check out my favorite self-help books: https://kit.co/TherapyinaNutshell/best-self-help-books

Therapy in a Nutshell and the information provided by Emma McAdam are solely intended for informational and entertainment purposes and are not a substitute for advice, diagnosis, or treatment regarding medical or mental health conditions. Although Emma McAdam is a licensed marriage and family therapist, the views expressed on this site or any related content should not be taken for medical or psychiatric advice. Always consult your physician before making any decisions related to your physical or mental health. In therapy I use a combination of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Systems Theory, positive psychology, and a bio-psycho-social approach to treating mental illness and other challenges we all face in life. The ideas from my videos are frequently adapted from multiple sources. Many of them come from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, especially the work of Steven Hayes, Jason Luoma, and Russ Harris. The sections on stress and the mind-body connection derive from the work of Stephen Porges (the Polyvagal theory), Peter Levine (Somatic Experiencing) Francine Shapiro (EMDR), and Bessel Van Der Kolk. I also rely heavily on the work of the Arbinger institute for my overall understanding of our ability to choose our life's direction.

And deeper than all of that, the Gospel of Jesus Christ orients my personal worldview and sense of security, peace, hope, and love https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/comeuntochrist/believe

If you are in crisis, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/ or 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or your local emergency services.

Copyright Therapy in a Nutshell, LLC

Overthinking Part 3: How to Stop Depressive Rumination

Overthinking Part 3: How to Stop Depressive Rumination

September 7, 2022

Want individualized support to stop dwelling on the past? My sponsor, BetterHelp, connects you to a licensed professional counselor from the comfort of your own home. Try it now for 10% off your first month: https://betterhelp.com/therapyinanuts...

Depressive rumination is a type of overthinking where you create the habit of dwelling on the past. You rehash all the terrible things you can think of over and over and over. Depressive rumination says “Why is life so awful? Why am I such a failure? Why can’t I ever be happy?”. Rumination is like ruts in a road, whenever you’re not paying attention, you slip back down into thinking about all your regrets. But then you spin your wheels, you think and think but never get anywhere. One of my other clients, Elena, constantly dwelt in the past, she’d Ruminate like this “ Why did I buy this car? I’m such an idiot!” Or she’d say “Why am I so depressed?” and she’d worry about it for hours every day, for months. But she didn’t just dwell in the past, she projected it into the future. In session she’d often say “What if my depression never gets better?”. Another type of rumination is dwelling on how you were mistreated. Maybe your dad shamed you when you came out to him as gay, or your boss threw you under the bus at work, or your lover ghosted you, and you spend hours of your day wondering why they did that, alternating between resentment towards them and wondering if it was your fault. Rumination might also look like fantasizing about how your life could have been better if you had done things differently. Rumination contributes to depression, anxiety, and hopelessness.

Learn more in one of my in-depth mental health courses: https://courses.therapyinanutshell.co...

Support my mission on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/therapyinanut...

Sign up for my newsletter: https://www.therapyinanutshell.com?utm_medium=YTDescription&utm_source=YouTube

Check out my favorite self-help books: https://kit.co/TherapyinaNutshell/bes... 

Therapy in a Nutshell and the information provided by Emma McAdam are solely intended for informational and entertainment purposes and are not a substitute for advice, diagnosis, or treatment regarding medical or mental health conditions. Although Emma McAdam is a licensed marriage and family therapist, the views expressed on this site or any related content should not be taken for medical or psychiatric advice. Always consult your physician before making any decisions related to your physical or mental health. In therapy I use a combination of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Systems Theory, positive psychology, and a bio-psycho-social approach to treating mental illness and other challenges we all face in life. The ideas from my videos are frequently adapted from multiple sources. Many of them come from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, especially the work of Steven Hayes, Jason Luoma, and Russ Harris. The sections on stress and the mind-body connection derive from the work of Stephen Porges (the Polyvagal theory), Peter Levine (Somatic Experiencing) Francine Shapiro (EMDR), and Bessel Van Der Kolk. I also rely heavily on the work of the Arbinger institute for my overall understanding of our ability to choose our life's direction.

And deeper than all of that, the Gospel of Jesus Christ orients my personal worldview and sense of security, peace, hope, and love https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/c...

If you are in crisis, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/ or 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or your local emergency services.

Copyright Therapy in a Nutshell, LLC

Overthinking Part 2: 6 Therapy Skills to Stop Overthinking Everything

Overthinking Part 2: 6 Therapy Skills to Stop Overthinking Everything

September 6, 2022

Learn more in one of my in-depth mental health courses: https://courses.therapyinanutshell.co...

Looking for affordable online counseling? My sponsor, BetterHelp, connects you to a licensed professional from the comfort of your own home. Try it now for 10% off your first month: https://betterhelp.com/therapyinanuts...

OK, so how can we stop overthinking everything? 1. The very first skill to stop overthinking is noticing and naming. Rumination is a bad habit that we’re often not aware we’re doing. First, get really good at identifying overthinking, say it out loud “I’m overthinking.” Ask someone to point it out to you. Learn your triggers. What time of day are you most likely to ruminate? Where are you most likely to overthink? At work? When you’re alone? When you’re at the bar? What situations trigger it? Try to predict it. So if you’re most likely to overthink something right as you go to bed or right after a social situation, prepare yourself to notice it so that you shift your focus to something more helpful. If you’re struggling to catch yourself overthinking, you could set an alarm on your phone to go off once an hour and check how much you’ve been ruminating that hour. And just track it for a week. In general, people tend to ruminate the most when they have nothing to occupy their attention. Now that you’ve gotten good at noticing when you’re overthinking, we’re going to take 2 approaches to stop overthinking everything. 1- setting limits on overthinking and 2- learn a bunch of ways to redirect your thoughts to something more helpful.

Support my mission on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/therapyinanut...

Sign up for my newsletter: https://www.therapyinanutshell.com?utm_medium=YTDescription&utm_source=YouTube

Check out my favorite self-help books: https://kit.co/TherapyinaNutshell/bes... 

Therapy in a Nutshell and the information provided by Emma McAdam are solely intended for informational and entertainment purposes and are not a substitute for advice, diagnosis, or treatment regarding medical or mental health conditions. Although Emma McAdam is a licensed marriage and family therapist, the views expressed on this site or any related content should not be taken for medical or psychiatric advice. Always consult your physician before making any decisions related to your physical or mental health. In therapy I use a combination of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Systems Theory, positive psychology, and a bio-psycho-social approach to treating mental illness and other challenges we all face in life. The ideas from my videos are frequently adapted from multiple sources. Many of them come from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, especially the work of Steven Hayes, Jason Luoma, and Russ Harris. The sections on stress and the mind-body connection derive from the work of Stephen Porges (the Polyvagal theory), Peter Levine (Somatic Experiencing) Francine Shapiro (EMDR), and Bessel Van Der Kolk. I also rely heavily on the work of the Arbinger institute for my overall understanding of our ability to choose our life's direction.

And deeper than all of that, the Gospel of Jesus Christ orients my personal worldview and sense of security, peace, hope, and love https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/c...

If you are in crisis, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/ or 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or your local emergency services.

Copyright Therapy in a Nutshell, LLC

Overthinking Part 1: The 4 Subconscious Reasons You Overthink Everything

Overthinking Part 1: The 4 Subconscious Reasons You Overthink Everything

September 5, 2022

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Depressive rumination is a type of overthinking where you create the habit of dwelling on the past. You rehash all the terrible things you can think of over and over and over. Depressive rumination says “Why is life so awful? Why am I such a failure? Why can’t I ever be happy?” Rumination is like ruts in a road, whenever you’re not paying attention, you slip back down into thinking about all your regrets. But then you spin your wheels, you think and think but never get anywhere. One of my other clients, Elena, constantly dwelt in the past, she’d Ruminate like this “ Why did I buy this car? I’m such an idiot!” Or she’d say “Why am I so depressed?” and she’d worry about it for hours every day, for months. But she didn’t just dwell in the past, she projected it into the future. In session she’d often say “What if my depression never gets better?”. Another type of rumination is dwelling on how you were mistreated. Maybe your dad shamed you when you came out to him as gay, or your boss threw you under the bus at work, or your lover ghosted you, and you spend hours of your day wondering why they did that, alternating between resentment towards them and wondering if it was your fault. Rumination might also look like fantasizing about how your life could have been better if you had done things differently. Rumination contributes to depression, anxiety, and hopelessness.

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Therapy in a Nutshell and the information provided by Emma McAdam are solely intended for informational and entertainment purposes and are not a substitute for advice, diagnosis, or treatment regarding medical or mental health conditions. Although Emma McAdam is a licensed marriage and family therapist, the views expressed on this site or any related content should not be taken for medical or psychiatric advice. Always consult your physician before making any decisions related to your physical or mental health. In therapy I use a combination of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Systems Theory, positive psychology, and a bio-psycho-social approach to treating mental illness and other challenges we all face in life. The ideas from my videos are frequently adapted from multiple sources. Many of them come from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, especially the work of Steven Hayes, Jason Luoma, and Russ Harris. The sections on stress and the mind-body connection derive from the work of Stephen Porges (the Polyvagal theory), Peter Levine (Somatic Experiencing) Francine Shapiro (EMDR), and Bessel Van Der Kolk. I also rely heavily on the work of the Arbinger institute for my overall understanding of our ability to choose our life's direction.

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If you are in crisis, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/ or 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or your local emergency services. Copyright Therapy in a Nutshell, LLC

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